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WHEN SHOULD YOU UPGRADE YOUR CHILD’S CAR SEAT

This is just an example car seat. I do not promote the brand in any way.

One of our main questions as parents is "WHEN SHOULD I UPGRADE MY CHILD'S CAR SEAT?

As per an article from Consumer Reports, written by Emily A. Thomas, Ph.D., there are six reasons why a parent should upgrade their child's car seat.

With your child's safety the primary goal, the following are the six reasons to upgrade:

1. WHEN YOUR CHILD IS TOO BIG FOR AN INFANT SEAT

  • Many rear facing seats have a weight limit of 30 pounds or so.
  • Because they don’t have height limits, you’re child may out grow the infant seat long before he/she reaches the estimated weight limit.
  • A convertible seat (no, it’s not designed for convertible cars) it’s the next best step because it can face the front or the back of the car and allow your child to still be rear facing.

2. WHEN YOUR CHILD TURNS ONE

  • Based on the most recent recommendations and test results, if your child turns one and still can fit in a rear-facing infant seat, then the safest thing to do is switch to a rear-facing CONVERTIBLE SEAT.
  • Simulated crash tests showed that a one year old was far more likely to hit their head on the BACK of the FRONT SEAT while in a rear-facing infant seat.
  • It was less likely when when riding in a rear-facing CONVERTIBLE CAR SEAT.

3. WHEN YOUR CHILD'S CAR SEAT EXPIRES

  • Most parents don’t realize that child car seats actually have expiration dates.  Especially when that car seat is being used by other small children in the same family.
  • The owners manual/seat label will tell you when the seat was built and when it should no longer be used.  It’s usually around six years.
  • Also, the seats need to meet the contemporary safety standards that are always being raised, therefore changed

4. IF YOUR CHILD'S SEAT HAS BEEN IN A CRASH

  • After a minor fender bender, your child’s car seat can still be used.
  • The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) recommends replacing a seat after a collision that either involved injuries or required the vehicle to be towed; airbags were deployed; or if the seat (or the door near the seat) was damaged.

5. WHEN YOUR CHILD'S CAR SEAT IS DAMAGED

  •  It’s not that hared to believe that daily use, heating and cooling cycles, and less-than-careful storage can take a toll on a car seat’s structure and integrity.
  • You should check for cracks, loose parts, and  worn straps and fasteners.
  • If a seat is damaged in any way, it will not offer as much protection in a crash as it needs to.

6. WHEN IT'S SIMPLY TIME FOR THE NEXT STEP

  • Make sure that you don’t rush the process and put your child in a car seat that doesn’t fit it appropriately.
  • Other than moving from a rear-facing infant seat to a rear-facing CONVERTIBLE SEAT, other transitions may be less safe for your child.
  • For example:  a forward-facing seat is LESS safe than a rear-facing seat; a booster seat is LESS safe that a forward-facing harnessed seat.

Don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE  for your downloadable FREEBIE so you can access Consumer Report’s 10 TOP CAR SEATS including: Infant Seats; Convertible Seats; and High-back & Back-less Boosters.

 

Also, you can SUBSCRIBE for another FREEBIE called “10 FAMILY FRIENDLY RECIPES PREPARED IN 10 MINUTES!”  Bon Apetit!!

 

Check out my YouTube Channel: Nanabanana Wisdom, that coincides with this car seat topic and other great videos where you can learn even more great parenting tips and advice.

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